Humanities/Social Science - Liberal Arts and Sciences

Associate in Arts Degree

This degree program is designed to meet the basic requirements of the first two years of college programs for students who plan to graduate and transfer to a four-year college or university. The program offers a wide range of flexibility in terms of a student’s ultimate educational goals and provides adequate preparation for further study leading to professional competence in specialized fields, especially in the humanities or the social sciences.

These programs also accommodate individuals seeking two years of a liberal arts higher education.

The program offers options in Human Services, Humanities/International Studies, Humanities/Broadcasting Arts and Technology, Humanities/Media Studies - Journalism, Humanities/Music, Humanities/Musical Theatre and Humanities/Social Science.

AA Humanities/Social Science

An Option within Liberal Arts and Sciences

(P1130)


The Liberal Arts Humanities/Social Science program is an ideal foundation for transfer to four-year colleges and universities in a wide variety of majors including English, History, Languages, Economics, Psychology, Sociology, Communication, Global Studies, Political Science and many other fields. It is considered a starting point for careers in law, education, science, government and human services or for those whose academic interests are in the specialized areas of the social sciences or humanities. After receiving the associate’s degree, students in this program generally transfer to earn a bachelor’s degree. The program especially accommodates students who wish to focus on general education classes or who want to take college-level courses for their own enrichment. Students uncertain of their career goals are offered an opportunity for exploration within this program.

Articulation Agreements

Students should check with the Transfer Office about articulation agreements with this program.

If you are considering a career in teaching, please read about the County College of Morris Teacher Education Specializations in English, History, Psychology, Sociology and Spanish.

General Education Foundation
Communication9
English Composition I
English Composition II
Speech Fundamentals
Math-Science-Technology12
Choose from General Education course list
Mathematics
Laboratory Science
Technology
Social Science6
General Psychology
Principles of Sociology
Humanities9
Choose from General Education course list
History6
Choose from General Education course list
Diversity3
Choose from General Education course list
General Education Foundation Credits45
Liberal Arts Core
Literature Survey or Language Sequence6
Restricted Elective12
Liberal Arts Core Credits18
Total Credits63

TRACKS WITHIN CURRICULUM 1130 - LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES

Within the Liberal Arts Curriculum are tracks which afford students an opportunity to concentrate in a particular area of liberal studies: English, History, Philosophy, Psychology, and Sociology. These tracks are distinct from the Education Specializations. All General Education requirements apply to these tracks.

In English, there are two tracks, Literature and Writing.  There are two tracks in History as well, one in American History and the other in Western Civilization.  The Sociology track is in Women and Gender Studies.  There are Liberal Arts and Sciences tracks in Philosophy and Psychology as well.

Liberal Arts and Sciences - American History Track

General Education Foundation
COMMUNICATION9
English Composition I
English Composition II
Speech Fundamentals
MATH/SCIENCE/TECHNOLOGY12
Mathematics (3-8 CR)
Laboratory Science (4-8 CR)
Technology (0-4 CR)
SOCIAL SCIENCE 6
General Psychology
Principles of Sociology
HUMANITIES9
American Art
History of American Women
Elective 3 CR (Refer to Humanities General Education List)
HISTORY6
Emergence of America - U.S. History I
Twentieth Century American History - U.S. History II
DIVERSITY3
History of the African-American Experience
History of Minorities in U.S.
General Education Foundation Credits45
Liberal Arts Core
ENG-249American Literature From the Colonial to The Civil War3
ENG-250American Literature From the Civil War To the Twentieth Century3
POL-111American Government3
Restricted Elective (9 CR) - See Curriculum Checksheet9
Liberal Arts Core Credits18
Total Credits63

Liberal Arts and Sciences - Western Civilization Track

General Education Foundation
COMMUNICATION9
English Composition I
English Composition II
Speech Fundamentals
MATH/SCIENCE/TECHNOLOGY12
(Choose from General Education course list)
Mathematics (3-8 CR)
Laboratory Science (4-8 CR)
Technology (0-4 CR)
SOCIAL SCIENCE6
General Psychology
Principles of Sociology
HUMANITIES9
Early Modern Europe
Modern Europe
Introduction to Philosophy
HISTORY6
The Ancient World-Greece and Rome
The Middle Ages
DIVERSITY3
Art History I
Art History II
General Education Foundation Credits45
LIBERAL ARTS CORE
Literature Survey/Language Sequence (See Curriculum Checksheet)6
Restricted Elective (See Curriculum Checksheet)12
LIBERAL ARTS CORE Credits18
Total Credits63

Liberal Arts and Sciences - Writing Track

GENERAL EDUCATION FOUNDATION
COMMUNICATION9
English Composition I
English Composition II
Speech Fundamentals
MATH/SCIENCE/TECHNOLOGY12
Choose from General Education Course List
Mathematics (3-8 CR)
Laboratory Science (4-8 CR)
Technology (0-4 CR)
SOCIAL SCIENCE6
General Psychology
Principles of Sociology
HUMANITIES (See Curriculum Checksheet)9
HISTORY (See Curriculum Checksheet)6
DIVERSITY (See Curriculum Checksheet)3
GENERAL EDUCATION FOUNDATION Credits45
LIBERAL ARTS CORE
Literature Survey (See Curriculum Checksheet)6
Restricted Electives (See Curriculum Checksheet)6
ENG-113Creative Writing3
ENG-114Advanced Creative Writing3
LIBERAL ARTS CORE Credits18
Total Credits63

Liberal Arts and Sciences - Philosophy Track

General Education Foundation
COMMUNICATION9
English Composition I
English Composition II
Speech Fundamentals
MATH/SCIENCE/TECHNOLOGY12
Mathematics (3-8 CR)
Laboratory Science (4-8 CR)
Technology (0-4 CR)
SOCIAL SCIENCE6
General Psychology
Principles of Sociology
HUMANITIES9
Introduction to Philosophy
Ethics
Logic
HISTORY (See Curriculum Checksheet)6
DIVERSITY3
Philosophy and Religion
General Education Foundation Credits45
LIBERAL ARTS CORE
Literature Survey or Language Sequence (See Curriculum Checksheet)6
Restricted Elective (See Curriculum Checksheet)9
PHL-211Philosophy of the Person3
LIBERAL ARTS CORE Credits18
Total Credits63

Liberal Arts and Sciences - Literature Track

General Education Foundation
COMMUNICATION9
English Composition I
English Composition II
Speech Fundamentals
MATH/SCIENCE/TECHNOLOGY12
Choose from General Education course list
Mathematics (3-8 CR)
Laboratory Science (4-8 CR)
Technology (0-4 CR)
SOCIAL SCIENCE6
General Psychology
Principles of Sociology
HUMANITIES (see Curriculum Checksheet)9
HISTORY (See Curriculum Checksheet)6
DIVERSITY (See Curriculum Checksheet)3
General Education Foundation Credits45
LIBERAL ARTS CORE
ENG-246English Classics From Beowulf to Paradise Lost: a Survey of Drama, Romances and Epics3
ENG-247Romantics, Victorians and Moderns- Major British Writers of the 19th and 20th Centuries3
Restricted Elective (See Curriculum Checksheet)12
LIBERAL ARTS CORE Credits18
Total Credits63

Liberal Arts and Sciences - Women and Gender Studies Track

General Education Foundation
COMMUNICATION9
English Composition I
English Composition II
Speech Fundamentals
MATH/SCIENCE/TECHNOLOGY12
Mathematics (3-8 CR)
Laboratory Science (4-8 CR)
Technology (0-4 CR)
SOCIAL SCIENCE6
General Psychology
Principles of Sociology
HUMANITIES9
History of American Women
Women in Literature
Humanities Elective (See Curriculum Checksheet)
HISTORY (See Curriculum Checksheet)6
DIVERSITY3
Sociology of Gender
General Education Foundation Credits45
LIBERAL ARTS CORE
Literature Survey/Language Sequence (See Curriculum Checksheet)6
Restricted Elective (See Curriculum Checksheet)12
(Recommend Women in Film ENG 214)
LIBERAL ARTS CORE Credits18
Total Credits63

Liberal Arts and Sciences - Psychology Track

General Education Foundation
COMMUNICATION9
English Composition I
English Composition II
Speech Fundamentals
MATH/SCIENCE/TECHNOLOGY12
Mathematics (3-8 CR)
Laboratory Science (4-8 CR)
Technology (0-4 CR)
SOCIAL SCIENCE6
General Psychology
Principles of Sociology
HUMANITIES9
HISTORY6
DIVERSITY3
Cross-Cultural Psychology
OR
Psychology and Education of the Disabled
General Education Foundation Credits45
LIBERAL ARTS CORE
Literature Survery/Language Sequence6
PSYCHOLOGY COURSES9
Developmental Psychology - the Human Lifespan
Child Psychology
OR
Adolescent Psychology
OR
Psychology of Personality
RESTRICTED ELECTIVE3
LIBERAL ARTS CORE Credits18
Total Credits63

Dr. Bruce Dutra

Division Dean, Liberal Arts

Ph.D., M.A., Purdue University

B.A., University of Delaware

CH253  973-328-5400  bdutra@ccm.edu

Courses

Course usage information

ART-101. Art Start - a Creative Experience. 3 Credits.

LECT 1 hr, LAB 3 hrs
Art Start is designed to introduce the novice, the absolute beginning student, to a basic history of art, the tools and techniques used to make art, and the simple pleasure and experience of working with a variety of materials to create expressive art objects. No talent or prior experience is required. Instruction emphasizes process over product and hands-on experience as an avenue to understanding art theory and philosophy. Art Start experiences include collage, assemblage, drawing, watercolor painting, acrylic painting, printmaking and clay sculpture. This course is aerobics for the brain and soul food for the creative artist hiding within every person.
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

ART-114. Contemporary Art. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
Contemporary Art launches with a review of 19th and 20th century art and then brings students to the here and now, the art and the artists of today. In lectures, multimedia presentations and field experiences, students are exposed to the pluralism of the new global art world.

Course usage information

ART-116. American Art. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
A survey and overview of the development of visual art traditions in America beginning with the colonization of the Americas and continuing through the Modern and Post-Modern periods. Arts, crafts and architecture are examined as well as Native American, African American, Hispanic and other cultural influences contributing to the development of a uniquely American experience and vision.

Course usage information

ART-122. Drawing I. 3 Credits.

LECT 2 hrs, LAB 3 hrs
In Drawing I, beginning art students learn the methods, materials and visual information needed to draw what we see. In small steps, students are led through a series of simple exercises designed to build competence and confidence. The diversity and complexity of the subjects drawn gradually grows along with students' drawing and visual skills. Students create a sketch book and a portfolio including still life drawings, landscape drawings, perspective drawings and portraiture. Materials used include pencil,charcoal, conte crayon and ink.
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

ART-123. Drawing II. 3 Credits.

LECT 2 hrs, LAB 3 hrs
Drawing II is an intermediate-level drawing course designed for students who wish to build upon the skills and knowledge acquired in ART-122 Drawing I. Students explore a wide range of tools, mediums and surfaces. Larger scale drawings, the introduction of color in drawing and experimentation with subjects and visual space are encouraged. Drawing II also includes a study of basic anatomy for artists and an introduction to drawing from live nude models, both male and female. By semester end, successful students will have created a sketch book and diverse portfolio of competent and expressive drawings that complement student portfolios begun in ART-122 Drawing I.
Prerequisites: ART-122
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

ART-124. Figure Drawing. 3 Credits.

LECT 2 hrs, LAB 3 hrs
In Figure Drawing, student artists draw from live nude models, both male and female, study in-depth anatomy for artists and explore a variety of methods and materials to create expressive drawings of the human figure. By the end of the semester, successful students will have created a wide selection of figure drawings to support the drawing portfolio begun in Drawing I and continued in Drawing II.
Prerequisites: ART-122, ART-123
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

ART-130. Two Dimensional Design. 3 Credits.

LECT 2 hrs, LAB 3 hrs
In Two Dimensional Design, students learn, through lectures, multimedia presentations, and simple drawing, painting and collage projects, how to control and compose visual elements on a two-dimensional plane. These visual elements include line, shape, light, texture, scale and a brief introduction to color applied on two-dimensional surfaces such as paper, board and canvas-board. Student artists who successfully complete this course will have a solid initial portfolio and the fundamental knowledge and basic skills needed to create better, more effective photographs, drawings, paintings, prints, illustrations, designs and graphic designs.
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

ART-131. Color Theory. 3 Credits.

LECT 2 hrs, LAB 3 hrs
In Color Theory students learn, through lectures, multimedia presentations and assigned projects using a variety of art mediums, how color affects the human eye, mind, body and spirit. Students who successfully complete this course will add a strong body of artwork that exhibits a working knowledge of color theory and its application in the visual arts, adding to the initial portfolio of artwork created in Drawing I and Two Dimensional Design.
Prerequisites: ART-122, ART-130
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

ART-132. Three Dimensional Design. 3 Credits.

LECT 2 hrs, LAB 3 hrs
In Three Dimensional Design, students, through lectures, multimedia presentations and assigned projects using a variety of materials and the basic aspects of planning, sketching and modeling,learn to understand and control the visual and physical forces inherent in the creation of three-dimensional objects. Students who successfully complete this course will add a body of three-dimensional art work to their portfolios. Student artists will also possess the fundamental knowledge and basic skills needed to pursue further studies in sculpture, ceramics, design (product, industrial, interior, fashion) and architecture.
Prerequisites: ART-122, ART-130
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

ART-133. Art History I. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
Art History I is a global survey of the major developments in painting, sculpture and architecture from the cave art of prehistory through the art of Africa, the Near East, South and South East Asia, Korea, China, Japan, Egypt, Greece and Rome, through the Gothic in Europe. Students explore, through lectures, multimedia presentations and a field experience at major art museums, the social, technological and spiritual changes that influenced the evolution of subjects, styles and ideas expressed in early art.

Course usage information

ART-134. Art History II. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
Art History II explores the significant developments in painting, sculpture and architecture from the High Renaissance to the art of the late 20th century, and the art of Africa and the Americas. Political, religious, scientific, industrial and technological revolutions are mirrored in the powerful and dramatic changes that take place in the art world. Through lecture, visual presentations and a field experience, students discover important stylistic movements of the last half-millennium from around the world.

Course usage information

ART-219. Painting I. 3 Credits.

LECT 2 hrs, LAB 3 hrs
Painting I introduces students to the technical, formal and creative aspects of painting in either oil or acrylic paint. Student artists work with diverse subject matter and explore a variety of methods, tools and materials.
Prerequisites: ART-122, ART-130, ART-131
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

ART-220. Painting II. 3 Credits.

LECT 2 hrs, LAB 3 hrs
Painting II advances students in the technical, formal and creative aspects of painting in either oil or acrylic paint. Student artists work with diverse subject matter and explore a variety of methods,tools and materials.
Prerequisites: ART-219
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

ART-223. Printmaking I. 3 Credits.

LECT 2 hrs, LAB 3 hrs
Printmaking I introduces students to the historical, technical, formal and creative aspects of printmaking. Student artists work with new nontoxic water-based materials in an exploration of printing methods such as monotypes, relief prints, silk-screens and etching.
Prerequisites: ART-122, ART-130.

Course usage information

ART-224. Printmaking II. 3 Credits.

LECT 2 hrs, LAB 3 hrs
Printmaking II is a continuation of Printmaking I with greater emphasis on color, originality, personal style and self-expression. Student artists are challenged to create a connected body of prints or an artist's book.
Prerequisites: ART-122, ART-130, ART-131, ART-223.

Course usage information

ART-228. Sculpture I. 3 Credits.

LECT 2 hrs, LAB 3 hrs
In Sculpture I, students explore space and form, and three-dimensional media in the creation of expressive sculptural objects. Students model, carve and construct in a variety of media such as clay, plaster, stone, wood, metal and paper.
Prerequisites: ART-122, ART-130, ART-131, ART-132
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

ART-229. Sculpture II. 3 Credits.

LECT 2 hrs, LAB 3 hrs
Sculpture II builds on the basic skills acquired in prerequisite courses and Sculpture I. Sculpture II is an extension of Sculpture I with a greater emphasis on originality and personal style and self-expression. Student artists continue to develop their understanding of the human figure, form and of the media and techniques by which to represent them.
Prerequisites: ART-228
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

ART-230. Portfolio and Presentation. 3 Credits.

LECT 2 hrs, LAB 3 hrs
Portfolio and Presentation guides students in the selection of artworks appropriate to include in final portfolios. Students improve, restore, repair or complete any work necessary to the portfolio. Students assemble, collate and document all work in physical and digital forms in preparation for submission to targeted transfer institutions, galleries, museums or prospective employers or clients. Students create written documents including resumes, cover letters and biographies to support professional activities. A final art exhibition and formal presentation of the portfolio and supporting materials are required.
Prerequisites: ART-122, ART-130, ART-131 and ART-132
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

ART-233. Independent Study I. 1 Credit.

LECT 1 hr
Course study designed with a faculty advisor. The student is responsible for developing a statement of goals and objectives and submitting proposed projects.
Prerequisites: Permission of department chair
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

ART-234. Independent Study II. 2 Credits.

LECT 2 hrs
A project designed with a faculty advisor. The student is responsible for developing a statement of goals and objectives, maintaining a weekly log and submitting a summary project.
Prerequisites: Permission of department chair
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

ART-237. Watercolor Painting. 3 Credits.

LECT 1 hr, LAB 4 hrs
In this course, students learn, through demonstration and experience, how to paint using the expressive medium of watercolor. Students create still life, landscape, figurative and abstract paintings. Students who successfully complete this course will have a portfolio of watercolor paintings and the fundamental knowledge and basic skills needed to effectively use the medium.

Course usage information

ART-238. Independent Study III. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
A project designed with a faculty advisor. The student is responsible for developing a statement of goals and objectives, maintaining a weekly log and submitting a summary project.
Prerequisites: Permission of department chair
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

ART-241. Ceramics I. 3 Credits.

LECT 2 hrs, LAB 3 hrs
The study and practice of ceramics - the preparation of clay, hand building,wheel-throwing and glazing. Emphasis is placed on contemporary American techniques.
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

ART-242. Ceramics II. 3 Credits.

LECT 2 hrs, LAB 3 hrs
The study and practice of ceramics. Emphasis is placed on producing finished ceramic artworks.
Prerequisites: ART-241
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

ART-291. Special Topics in Art. 3 Credits.

LECT 2 hrs, LAB 3 hrs
Studio work in selected topics or issues in art.
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

ART-292. Special Topics in Art. 3 Credits.

LECT 1 hr, LAB 4 hrs
Studio work in selected topics or issues in art.
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

ECO-113. Elements of Economics. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
This is a one semester course that combines abstract principles, simple geometric approaches, applied problems and their analysis for those students seeking an understanding of some fundamental economic principles and laws. This understanding is enhanced by exploring the mechanics, operations and usefulness of economics to consumer, businesses, governments, both nationally and internationally.

Course usage information

ECO-120. Economics and Economic Issues. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
This course combines economic principles with applications to contemporary problems. Emphasis is placed on using economic concepts to analyze and understand social, political, philosophical and diversity issues. This course is a social science elective.

Course usage information

ECO-211. Principles of Economics I Macroeconomics. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
Macroeconomics is the study of aggregate economic behavior. National income, employment, price stability and economic growth are analyzed. Fiscal and monetary policies to alleviate inflation and unemployment are also studied.
Prerequisites: MAT-016 or equivalent.

Course usage information

ECO-212. Principles of Economics II Microeconomics. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
Microeconomics is the study of prices and markets. Product and resource markets under competitive and non-competitive conditions are analyzed. Behavior of the firm in the determination of price, output and employment of the factors of production is examined. This course includes an introduction to international economics.
Prerequisites: ECO-211.

Course usage information

ECO-217. Economics of Labor. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
Labor economics analyzes the structure and performance of the market for labor and public policy as it affects the employment and remunerations of labor. Among the many multifaceted issues that may be explored are: demand for labor, supply of labor, employment and unemployment, inflation and wages, effects of unions on wages and employment, wage differentials, discrimination in the labor market, human capital theory, migration, job search, and the effects of international trade on domestic output, employment and wages.
Prerequisites: ECO-211
Corequisites: ECO-212.

Course usage information

ECO-291. Special Topics in Economics. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
This course examines selected topics or issues in economics. Topics may differ each time the course is offered. Students should consult the department chairperson for further information. This course is not offered every semester.

Course usage information

ECO-292. Special Topics in Economics. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
This course examines selected topics or issues in economics. Topics may differ each time the course is offered. Students should consult the department chairperson for further information. This course is not offered every semester.
Prerequisites: Permission of department chair.

Course usage information

ENG-007. Writing Skills Review. 0 Credits.

LECT 2 hr
An intense mini-course focused on the remediation of an individual's writing deficiencies as evidenced on the college's placement test. Students could be placed in this course as a pre-requisite to ENG-111.
Prerequisites: Enrollment from college's placement test.

Course usage information

ENG-022. Elements of Writing. 0 Credits.

LECT 1.5 hrs
An abbreviated version of ENG-025 Writing Skills, this class is for students who exhibit a level of skills on the English Placement Test that preempts their placement in a full semester non-credit course.
Prerequisites: Enrollment from college's placement test.

Course usage information

ENG-025. Writing Skills. 0 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
Designed to increase the student's proficiency in writing skills, paragraph development, the topic sentence, transitional techniques, comprehension, and supplemental structure and grammar. Lead to the short essay in preparation for English Composition I.
Prerequisites: Enrollment from college's placement test.

Course usage information

ENG-111. English Composition I. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
The first half of the 6-credit English Communications requirement emphasizes the fundamentals of written communications including expository prose, reading comprehension and interpretation, and rhetorical modes.
Prerequisites: Placement basis or ENG-025 or ENG-022 or ENG-007.

Course usage information

ENG-112. English Composition II. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
The second half of the English Communications requirement continues emphasis on expository prose and critical writing through the use of literary genres. Methods of literary research and a research paper are required.
Prerequisites: ENG-111 or ENG-131.

Course usage information

ENG-113. Creative Writing. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
A workshop course designed to encourage and develop talent in the writing of poetry, short fiction and/or drama. Class discussions center on manuscripts submitted by the students.
Corequisites: ENG-111 or ENG-131.

Course usage information

ENG-114. Advanced Creative Writing. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
A writer's workshop designed for students who have successfully completed Creative Writing and who wish to improve their work through discussion of class submissions and the works of established writers.
Prerequisites: ENG-113.

Course usage information

ENG-115. The Short Story. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
A study of the short story as a specialized art form, involving the study of writing techniques and styles, films and critical analysis of selected stories.
Prerequisites: ENG-111 or ENG-131.

Course usage information

ENG-116. The Novel. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
A survey of novels both classic and contemporary, with particular attention to the methods by which such novels are created. Included may be novelists as varied as Dickens, Camus, Flaubert, Vonnegut, Dostoyevsky, Bellow, Joyce and Hesse.
Prerequisites: ENG-111 or ENG-131.

Course usage information

ENG-118. Children's Literature. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
A survey of children's literature including poetry, picture books, fairy tales and folklore, myths and epics, realistic fiction, and fantasy, with a special emphasis on multicultural and ethnic works.
Prerequisites: ENG-111 or ENG-131.

Course usage information

ENG-119. Introduction to Poetry. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
Designed for the beginner to develop skill and confidence in reading, understanding, evaluating and appreciating poetry. Includes a wide variety of material but emphasizes short lyrics by major British and American authors. Students are not required to write original poetry.
Prerequisites: ENG-111 or ENG-131.

Course usage information

ENG-123. Introduction to Linguistics - Honors. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
The course examines the fundamental concepts of language structure and dynamics, including language development, variation and change. Students are required to apply and expand basic theory through independent research and projects that are presented to the class.
Prerequisites: ENG-111 or ENG-131 and permission of department chair or honors advisor.

Course usage information

ENG-131. English Composition I Honors. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
An advanced course in rhetoric and expository writing for students selected on the basis of academic record, testing or writing samples. Enriches the reading materials and assignments of English Composition I with supplementary materials designed to challenge the advanced student.
Prerequisites: Permission of honors advisor.

Course usage information

ENG-132. English Composition II Honors. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
A continuation of English Composition I-Honors designed to challenge the advanced student. The course emphasizes expository prose and introduces students to short story, poetry and drama and is a continuation of expository writing techniques introduced in English Composition I-Honors. This course is designed to give the advanced student experience in analyzing perceptively and writing critically about three literary genres: short story, poetry and drama.
Prerequisites: ENG-111 or ENG-131 and permission of department chair or honors advisor.

Course usage information

ENG-210. Fantasy Novels. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
This course will explore fantasy literature as a reaction to the rationalism and realism that dominate post-industrial literature and will explore fantasy's ability to capture imaginations, offer alternative visions, and serve as an analysis of human nature and contemporary society. Authors may include J.R.R. Tolkien, Ursula Le Guin, George R.R. Martin, J.K. Rowling, Neil Gaiman, and Patrick Rothfuss.
Prerequisites: ENG-111, ENG-112 or ENG-131 ENG-132.

Course usage information

ENG-214. Women in Film. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
Films from c. 1913 to the present are examined for the diverse images of women which they convey. Issues of class, race, ethnicity, global perspective and sexual preference are considered. Films by women directors and writers are emphasized, but coverage also includes works by significant male filmmakers. Genres range from classical Hollywood narrative fiction to documentary, animation and avant-garde.
Prerequisites: ENG-111 and ENG-112 or ENG-131 and ENG-132 or permission of department chair.

Course usage information

ENG-224. Women in Literature. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
Classic and contemporary literary works are examined for the images of women which they convey. Discussion focuses on relationships between such images and the realities of women's lives, past and present, in the United States and abroad. Issues of class, race, ethnicity, global perspective and sexual preference are considered in relationship to gender. Both male and female authors may be studied. Some film adaptations may be examined for comparisons with written works.
Prerequisites: ENG-111 and ENG-112 or ENG-131 and ENG-132 or permission of department chair.

Course usage information

ENG-233. History of the Theatre I. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
This course presents a historical survey of the major developments in the theatre from ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome through the time of Shakespeare. Students will become aware of the major developments in all areas of the theatre: acting, directing, design and theatre architecture.
Corequisites: ENG-112 or ENG-132.

Course usage information

ENG-234. History of the Theatre II. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
This course presents a historical survey of the major developments in the theatre from the time of Shakespeare to the present day. Each historical period includes study of the major dramatists and their works.
Prerequisites: ENG-112 or ENG-132 and ENG-233.

Course usage information

ENG-243. World Literary Traditions: Beginnings to 1650. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
A comprehensive survey of Western and non-Western literature from the ancient world to 1650. Among genres emphasized are epic, lyric and drama. Representative works from Europe, China, India, Japan and Africa are included.
Prerequisites: ENG-111, ENG-112 or ENG-131, ENG-132.

Course usage information

ENG-244. World Literary Traditions: 1650 to Present. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
A comprehensive survey of Western and non-Western literature from 1650 to the present. Representative works from Europe, China, India, Japan and Africa are included. Major authors may include Moliere, Flaubert, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Tagore and Achebe.
Prerequisites: ENG-111, ENG-112 or ENG-131, ENG-132.

Course usage information

ENG-246. English Classics From Beowulf to Paradise Lost: a Survey of Drama, Romances and Epics. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
A chronological overview of England's early literary works by selected writers such as Chaucer, Spencer, Shakespeare, Marlowe and Milton.
Prerequisites: ENG-111 and ENG-112 or ENG-131 and ENG-132.

Course usage information

ENG-247. Romantics, Victorians and Moderns- Major British Writers of the 19th and 20th Centuries. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
A survey of the Romantic, Victorian and Modern periods of British literature, and a study of the growth of the novel. Major writers may include Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, E. Bronte, Browning, Arnold, Tennyson, Hardy, Lawrence, Yeats, Eliot and Joyce.
Prerequisites: ENG-111, ENG-112 or ENG-131, ENG-132.

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ENG-249. American Literature From the Colonial to The Civil War. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
A survey of American literature from colonial beginnings to the Civil War, including but not restricted to Franklin, Cooper, Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Emerson, Thoreau and Whitman. The influence of women, Native Americans, African Americans and others who contributed to the development of American culture may be examined as well as concepts such as Calvinism, Neo-classicism and Romanticism.
Prerequisites: ENG-111, ENG-112 or ENG-131, ENG-132.

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ENG-250. American Literature From the Civil War To the Twentieth Century. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
A survey of literature written in America since 1865, including but not restricted to such writers as Dickinson, Twain, James, Wharton, Crane, Chopin, Eliot, Frost, Cather, Hemingway, Fitzgerald and Faulkner. The influence of women, African Americans, immigrants and others may be discussed along with cultural concepts such as Realism and Naturalism.
Prerequisites: ENG-111, ENG-112 or ENG-131, ENG-132.

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ENG-283. World Literary Traditions: Beginnings - 1650 - Honors. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
This course is the first part of a survey of world literature that focuses on classics from various cultures including Greek, Roman, Hebrew, Babylonian, Chinese, Persian, Japanese and European. Readings are intended to stimulate class discussions and thoughtful written assignments.
Prerequisites: ENG-111, ENG-112 or ENG-131, ENG-132 and permission of department chair or honors advisor.

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ENG-284. World Literary Traditions: 1650 to Present: Honors. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
This course is the second part of a survey of world literature that considers the major literary periods as reflected in classics of Western culture as well as African, Asian and Middle Eastern traditions. Attention is also given to racial issues. Readings are intended to stimulate both oral and written responses.
Prerequisites: ENG-111, ENG-112 or ENG-131, ENG-132 and Permission of department chair or honors advisor.

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HIS-113. Early Modern Europe. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
This course examines the transition from Medieval to Early Modern Europe. Included in the investigation are the Protestant Reformation and ensuing Catholic Counter-Reformation, and the causes and the consequences of the rise of the modern nation-state and the Enlightenment. It also traces the events precipitating the French Revolution and its aftermath.

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HIS-114. Modern Europe. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
This course surveys Europe since the French Revolution, including the nationalistic, liberal and socialist revolutions of the 19th and 20th Centuries. It investigates imperialism and the power struggles among Europe's established and newly emerged states culminating in World War I. It also examines the Paris Conference, Europe between the two wars, and the rise of European fascism, communism, World War II and its aftermath.

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HIS-117. The Ancient World-Greece and Rome. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
This course familiarizes the student with the cultural heritage of the ancient civilizations of the Mediterranean world, including Egypt, Greece and Rome. By the end of this course, the student should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the most important political, social, economic and cultural developments of the Mediterranean world. This course includes politics, economics, culture and religion.

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HIS-118. The Middle Ages. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
This course investigates European development from the fall of the Roman Empire to the collapse of the Byzantium in 1453. The course includes the analysis of key political, social, intellectual and economic experiences in Western Europe.

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HIS-122. History of Russia. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
The history of Russia from the Tsars to the present. Major emphasis is on the unique development of Russian culture during the Tsarist period through the collapse of the Soviet Union and post-Soviet period. Documents that reflect important developments are included.

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HIS-123. History of Modern Africa. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
This course deals with the history, politics, economics and culture of Africa from the mid-1880s to the present. It provides an analysis of colonialism, nationalism and transfer of power, nation building and economic development and the international relations of African states.

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HIS-147. History of Modern East Asia. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
A survey of modern East Asia including the impact of the West, the modernization of Japan, the origin and growth of the Chinese Communist Party and the Vietnam War.

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HIS-148. Modern Middle East. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
An examination of the historical development of the Middle East with emphasis on the 20th century. Topics covered include the development of nationalism, Pan-Arab movements and the Arab-Israeli conflicts.

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HIS-149. History of New Jersey. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
This course covers the history of the state from colonial times to the present. It emphasizes the lives of ordinary people as well as significant events and uses local history as a way of learning more about American history.

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HIS-151. Latin American History. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
A survey of the historical development of Latin America focusing on its African multicultural and multi-ethnic populations and its emergence as a force in the 20th century. Students examine original documents in order to analyze the structure of social, economic and cultural relationships. Special attention is paid to the development of Argentina, Mexico and the Caribbean nations and their relationship to the United States.

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HIS-160. History of Colonial and Revolutionary America. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
This course surveys the origin and development of the English colonies in America, from the earliest settlements through the Constitutional Convention of 1787. Major topics explored include population growth, territorial expansion, secularization of religious identity, colonial ideas and institutions, the development of English imperial policy and America's break with England.

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HIS-164. Civil War and Reconstruction. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
This course examines slavery and the other issues and events leading to the Civil War. Attention is focused on the political, economic, social and cultural developments of the era as well as on the war and the Reconstruction period.

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HIS-166. Emergence of America - U.S. History I. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
This course examines the first half of American history from the earliest settlements to the end of the 19th century with an emphasis on American expansion and settlement of the Continent and America's frontier heritage.

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HIS-167. Twentieth Century American History - U.S. History II. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
This course surveys the domestic history and foreign policy of the United States in the 20th century. The nation's immigrant experience, political development, urbanization, economic progress and emergence as a superpower are among the topics explored.

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HIS-181. The Middle Ages-Honors. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
This course allows students to investigate major events, as well as significant economic, social and political developments in both Western Europe and non-Western countries. Participants have the opportunity to read and examine primary sources in translation and scholarly monographs.
Prerequisites: Permission of department chair or honors advisor.

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HIS-183. Modern Social Thought - Honors. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
Covers selected topics in the period from the 17th century through contemporary time. Readings of representative social science thinkers are related to their historical context so that students gain an appreciation of the causal reciprocity which exists among theory, practice and culture.
Prerequisites: Permission of department chair.

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HIS-184. Early Modern Europe - Honors. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
This course allows students to investigate major events, as well as analyze significant economic, social, cultural and political ideas and themes through the investigation of primary documents in translation. The course covers European history during the period from 1350 to 1789.
Prerequisites: Permission of department chair or honors advisor.

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HIS-185. Modern Europe - Honors. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
This course allows students to investigate major events, as well as analyze significant economic, social, cultural and political ideas and themes through the investigation of primary documents in translation. This course covers European history during the period from 1789 to the present era.
Prerequisites: Permission of department chair or honors advisor.

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HIS-203. History of Minorities in U.S.. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
An historical survey of ethnic and racial minorities in the United States and the development of cultural pluralism. Emphasis is on the period since the Civil War, with attention to the role played by the various minorities in the nation's economic, political and cultural development and the status of these minority groups.

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HIS-204. History of the African-American Experience. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
A survey of African-Americans from their African origins to the present. Emphasis is on the historical importance of the slavery experience, the black experience in the Civil War and Reconstruction era, and the development of segregation. Special attention is given to 20th century black contributions to American life and thought, black leadership issues and movements relevant to the black experience.

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HIS-209. History of American Women. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
This course examines American women's experience from the colonial era through the contemporary feminist movement, including study of such key topics as the first women's movement, the suffrage and birth control movements, and concludes with understanding the conflicts and accomplishments inherent in women's status today.

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HIS-247. History of the American City and Suburb. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
A survey of the development of the American city from colonial times to the present, with concentration on the period since the Civil War. The problems facing urban America today and the exodus to the suburbs also are emphasized.

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HIS-291. Special Topics in History. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
An examination of selected topics or issues in history. Topics differ each time the course is offered. Students should consult the department chair for further information.
Prerequisites: An introductory course in History.

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HIS-292. Special Topics in History. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
An examination of selected topics or issues in history. Topics differ each time the course is offered. Students should consult the department chair for further information.
Prerequisites: An introductory course in History.

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PHL-111. Introduction to Philosophy. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
An introduction to major themes of Western and Asian philosophical thought designed to give the student a grasp of the fundamental option which reflective persons face between opposing views of the world. The way in which this option was formed is traced, and the manner is shown in which this choice influences one's thinking about topics such as the nature of the self, truth, religion, morality and government.
Prerequisites: Placement basis or ENG-025 or ENG-007 or ENG-022.

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PHL-114. Ethics. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
A survey of the most influential efforts of philosophers from diverse traditions to bring reason into the process of making appropriate and adequate choices in matters basic to the flourishing of human beings. Contemporary problems analyzed include end-of-life, reproductive, genetic engineering, punishment, business and environmental issues.
Prerequisites: Placement basis or ENG-025 or ENG-022 or ENG-007.

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PHL-115. Logic. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
Logic is the study of reasoning, good and bad. Good reasoning moves from credible statements to others that are well supported by them. Bad reasoning obscures this process. This course examines features that make reasoning good or bad, develops critical skills in recognizing formal and informal patterns of reasoning, and deepens one's talent in constructing arguments that exemplify good reasoning.
Prerequisites: Placement basis or ENG-007 or ENG-022 or ENG-025.

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PHL-180. Introduction to Philosophy-Honor. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
This seminar follows, conceptually and historically, dominant lines of philosophical thinking on themes widely taken to be fundamental in Western and Asian culture. The course also compares and contrasts classical with contemporary perspectives.
Prerequisites: Permission of department chair or honors advisor.

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PHL-210. American Philosophy. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
This course surveys important ideas, perspectives, and theories in the writings of prominent 19th and 20th century American philosophers, focusing on the classical pragmatism of Peirce, James, Dewey, and Mead. We will examine the larger intellectual and cultural context of American thought, referencing pivotal historical, legal, and intellectual events and traditions, especially the Civil War, Transcendentalism, and Darwinian evolutionary biology. This course aims to provide an understanding of the classical American pragmatist tradition and the relation of American philosophy to the history of philosophy and to American culture. Of central importance is the pragmatist connection between theory and action, that is, the effort not merely to make thought practical, but to make our practices, and our lives, intelligent.
Prerequisites: Placement basis or ENG-007 or ENG-022 or ENG-025.

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PHL-211. Philosophy of the Person. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
A lecture-discussion course of classical readings from religious and humanist authors centering on related notions of human nature, person, self, self-actualization and freedom. An effort is made to assess some social policies by reference to an adequate notion of the person.
Prerequisites: Placement basis or ENG-025 or ENG-022 or ENG-007.

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PHL-212. Philosophy and Religion. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
This course surveys the development and interaction of world religions, such as Judaism, Christianity, Islam, African religions, Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism and Shintoism. It examines major figures, stories, rituals and beliefs of the religions, and shows how they shape the lives of believers. Finally, it analyzes philosophical concepts such as God and gods, faith and reason, immortality, good and evil, karma, love, meditation, mysticism and nirvana.
Prerequisites: Placement basis or ENG-025 or ENG-022 or ENG-007.

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PHL-221. Philosophy of Plato. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
Concentrated readings and in-depth discussion of several of the great dialogues of Plato, chosen from the following: Meno, Republic, Laws, Phaedo, Symposium, Phaedrus, Apology and Crito.
Prerequisites: Placement basis or ENG-025 or ENG-022 or ENG-007.

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PHL-280. Ancient Philosophy-Honors. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
This seminar critically examines the central ideas of Plato and Aristotle on knowledge, mind, body, freedom, nature, ethics, politics and religion. The course also contrasts their ideas with those of other ancient philosophers, such as Pythagoras, Heraclitus, Parmenides, Zeno, Epicurus, Epictetus, Cicero and Aurelius. Students develop the ability to formulate their own views on philosophic issues.
Prerequisites: Permission of department chair or honors advisor.

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POL-111. American Government. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
A study of the myths and realities of the American political system. The course focuses on the constitutional development of the American system of government, the political, policymaking and implementing structures of American government, and the problem of representative government in the United States. Consideration is given to contemporary domestic and foreign policy issues.

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POL-222. Constitutional Law. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
This is a survey course which examines the constitutional development of the U.S., the growth of American constitutional doctrine and law, and the judicial process within which judicial decisions are formulated and given the force of law. The constitutional basis for the government's powers and the liberties of the individual are examined within this framework. Emphasis is given to landmark U.S. Supreme Court decisions.
Prerequisites: POL-111.

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POL-231. State and Local Government. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
A survey of the governing structures, politics and policies of local and state governments, with special emphasis on New Jersey. Students become acquainted with many of the major challenges and state issues facing local government today.

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POL-240. International Politics. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
An introduction to the nature and problems of international politics. Analysis and consideration is given to the development and contemporary status of nation-states, their relationships and the elements of power politics. Emphasis is given to problems of war and peace, the nature of conflict and the various approaches to world peace.

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POL-245. Comparative Government. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
An examination of the variety of governmental systems, both western and non-western, whose importance is reflected in the increasing interdependent nature of the world community. The political systems of the traditional European powers (Great Britain, Germany and Russia) and strategically important non-western nation-states (Japan, China, India and Mexico) are reviewed. Trends in government in the developing countries are studied as well.

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POL-270. Civil Liberties-Basic Rights and Freedom. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
An analysis and examination of individual rights within a democratic society. Focus is on such major issues as freedom of expression and religion, political and racial equality, privacy rights, and the Bill of Rights and its applicability to the states. The role of the judiciary, particularly the U.S. Supreme Court, is analyzed.

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POL-291. Special Topics in Political Science. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
An examination of selected topics or issues in political science. Topics may differ each time the course is offered. Students should consult the department chair for further information.
Prerequisites: An introductory course in Political Science.

Course usage information

POL-292. Special Topics in Political Science. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
An examination of selected topics or issues in political science. Topics may differ each time the course is offered. Students should consult the department chair for further information.
Prerequisites: An introductory course in Political Science.

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PSY-112. Career Development. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
An in-depth exploration of the role of societal norms and educational and psychological factors upon individual career choices. Students establish, change or confirm career goals and learn skills necessary for ongoing career and life planning.

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PSY-113. General Psychology. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
An introductory survey of the scientific studies of human behavior on the following topics: human development, physiology, learning, individual differences, motivation, perception, personality, abnormal and social behavior. The course is designed to prepare the student for further study of the broad spectrum of psychology.

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PSY-116. Psychology and Education of the Disabled. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
A study of the social, emotional, physical and learning characteristics of individuals with disabilities. Methods of diagnosis and differentiation, curriculum, teaching techniques, resources and integration into the community are examined.
Prerequisites: PSY-113.

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PSY-117. Health Psychology. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
This course examines the effects of the physical, mental, cultural and environmental stressors on one's mental and physical health. Modern and ancient beliefs regarding the interaction of the mind and body are presented.
Prerequisites: PSY-113.

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PSY-180. General Psychology - Honors. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
This honors course is a more advanced General Psychology course which includes, but is not restricted to, a more advanced text, emphasis on research methodology, and lectures which explore subject matter in greater depth. The course introduces students to the scientific study of behavior with emphasis on critical thinking skills. Students improve their abilities to analyze data objectively both in written and oral presentations. The General Psychology Honors section can be used to fulfill the Honors Social Science elective. Admission to the course is based on the recommendation of the honors program advisor only.
Prerequisites: Permission of department chair or honors advisor.

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PSY-213. Child Psychology. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
The course consists of the interplay of biological, psychological and cultural forces that shape the growing child from prenatal development through adolescence. Students learn to interpret relevant research using a critical-thinking approach.
Prerequisites: PSY-113.

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PSY-214. Adolescent Psychology. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
An examination of adolescence, the transitional period between childhood and adulthood. Issues covered include the adolescent in the context of family, school and work environments, emotional and cognitive changes and the maladapted adolescent.
Prerequisites: PSY-113.

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PSY-217. Educational Psychology. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
This course introduces the student to psychological theory as it applies to teaching and learning. Topics include learning theory, motivation, tests and measurements, classroom management and teaching students with special needs. Educational Psychology is strongly recommended for students pursuing a career in teaching.
Prerequisites: PSY-113.

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PSY-218. Cross-Cultural Psychology. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
The student is exposed to the psychological experiences and individual differences in cognitive, emotional and behavioral development of individuals who represent diverse populations within the United States and learn how one's self-perception and the perception of others affect well-being.
Prerequisites: PSY-113.

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PSY-219. Developmental Psychology - the Human Lifespan. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
The course considers the developing person from conception through death in terms of biosocial, cognitive and psychological development and discusses how these three domains interact. Additionally, it considers how contextual issues such as age, gender, culture, socioeconomic status and ethnicity broaden our understanding of human development.
Prerequisites: PSY-113.

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PSY-221. Psychology of Personality. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
An in-depth discussion of major personality theories and relevant research. There is a focus on application to case studies and life experiences.
Prerequisites: PSY-113.

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PSY-224. Abnormal Psychology. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
This course considers the tools involved in distinguishing abnormal from normal behavior. It surveys the range of mental disorders included in the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual including anxiety disorders, depression, addictions, problems of children and the elderly, deviance and schizophrenia, and covers modern treatment interventions.
Prerequisites: PSY-113.

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PSY-229. Community Mental Health. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
A survey of institutional and community-based mental health programs of prevention and treatment, sources of environmental stress, identification of high risk groups, and the role of professionals and volunteers in the field.
Prerequisites: PSY-113 or an introductory course in Sociology.

Course usage information

PSY-290. Independent Study in Psychology. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
The design, development and implementation of individual research from formulation of hypothesis to analysis of results in the field of psychology.
Prerequisites: PSY-113 and additional 3 credit Psychology course and permission of department chair.

Course usage information

PSY-291. Special Topics in Psychology. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
An examination of selected topics or issues in Psychology. Topics differ each time the course is offered. Students should consult the department chair for further information.
Prerequisites: PSY-113.

Course usage information

PSY-292. Honors Abnormal Psychology. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
This honors course is an in-depth coverage of the assessment, diagnosis and treatment of psychological disorders as categorized by the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual. Students are required to complete a research project using the American Psychological Association format.
Prerequisites: PSY-113 or PSY-180 and permission of Honors Advisor.

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SOC-108. Cultural Geography. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
The study of the interaction of contemporary cultures and their physical environment. This course examines processes of globalization and their impact on national and local level social processes. Emphasis is placed on the global capitalist economy and its relation to national economies, political systems, populations, environments and religions.
Prerequisites: Placement basis or ENG-025 or ENG-022 or ENG-007.

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SOC-110. Sociology of Health and Illness. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
An analysis of the structure and function of health institutions in society with emphasis on the social psychology of illness behavior, the practitioners of medicine, the social organization of the hospital, managed care and future trends in medical care.
Prerequisites: Placement basis or ENG-025 or ENG-022 or ENG-007.

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SOC-120. Principles of Sociology. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
A comprehensive introduction to the discipline of sociology, examining the basic concepts, e.g., role, status, social structure, research methods, culture, socialization, stratification, norms, values, groups, associations, institutions, community, deviance and society, as well as exploring its foundations and history, and techniques of seeing and understanding the world from a sociological perspective.

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SOC-180. Principles of Sociology - Honors. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
A systematic introduction to basic sociological concepts, culture, norms, status, role, groups, character structure, association, institutions, community, deviance and society.
Prerequisites: Permission of department chair or honors advisor.

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SOC-202. Contemporary Social Issues - America As a Diverse Society. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
Investigates issues that challenge citizens in post-modern America. Scientific analysis of topics such as global, political and economic trends, inequality, group conflicts, pluralism, urbanism, alienation and bureaucracy, family disorganization, mass communications, addictive behaviors and social movements. Special attention is given to field research which develops student competence in understanding contemporary social issues.
Prerequisites: SOC-120.

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SOC-206. Religion and Human Experience. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
An interdisciplinary course with sociological, psychological and anthropological perspectives on religion. Topics include interactions between the individual, society and religion, ritual and religious experience, religious organization and secularization. Comparisons are made between western and non-western religious systems. The rise of fundamentalism and new religious consciousness are also considered.
Prerequisites: An introductory course in Anthropology, Psychology or Sociology.

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SOC-209. The Family. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
Analysis of marriage and family in various cultures with in-depth study of the contemporary United States including historical development and future trends. Topics covered are romantic love, courtship, marital interaction, divorce, gender roles and the feminist movement. Special attention is given to the post-modern family and cross-cultural comparisons are made
Prerequisites: SOC-120.

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SOC-214. Cultural Diversity in America - the Sociology of Ethnic and Minority Groups. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
A study of diversity in American life with an emphasis on the cultural, political and interactional patterns of ethnic and minority groups. Topics covered include assimilation, intergroup cooperation and conflict, cross-cultural communication, and theories of prejudice and discrimination. Attention is also given to national and global demographic trends.
Prerequisites: SOC-120 or permission of department chair.

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SOC-215. Physical Anthropology. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
The study of humankind emphasizing human evolution with the integration of recent research in the areas of paleontology, primatology, human genetics and ethology. Objectives of the course are to provide a knowledge of humankind's biological and physical heritage with emphasis on origins and variations.

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SOC-216. Cultural Anthropology. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
An introduction to the analysis of non-western cultures and anthropological theory and methods. Emphasis is placed on the comparison of western and non-western cultures, including cross-cultural comparisons of political, economic, social and cognitive systems.

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SOC-217. Archaeology. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
Introduction to the general principles of archaeological research and theory. An overview of human history and prehistory as evidenced through material remains, including the rise of state-level societies in the old and new worlds.

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SOC-221. Sociology of Gender. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
An in-depth introduction to social science theory and research in the field of gender studies. The new scholarship on women's issues, feminism and gender relations is examined and critiqued.
Prerequisites: SOC-120.

Course usage information

SOC-222. Deviant Behavior. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
A review of deviant behavior by various deviant, outsider or disvalued members of a society, with emphasis on the environmental (socio-cultural) causes, the rewards and punishments of conforming or not conforming to group norms, the identification of deviants, the process of becoming prejudiced, why people conform, why people like each other, and the dynamics of groups. Topics are examined in a cross-cultural and historical perspective.
Prerequisites: SOC-120.

Course usage information

SOC-224. Social Psychology. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
A study of group behavior and the influence of groups on the perception, thinking and behavior of the individual. Topics are chosen from the following: social influences on the development of personality and attitudes, the causes of human aggression, the nature of prejudice, why people conform, why people like each other, and the dynamics of groups. Topics are examined in a cross-cultural and historical perspective.
Prerequisites: PSY-113 or SOC-120.

Course usage information

SOC-230. Sociology of Globalization. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
Is the current era of globalization a unique historical period or is it simply a variation of previous ones? This course examines recent social, economic and political trends, assesses the state of the world, and identifies the forces that are shaping it.
Prerequisites: SOC-120.

Course usage information

SOC-291. Special Topics in Sociology. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
An examination of selected topics or issues in sociology. Topics may differ each time the course is offered. Students should consult the department chair for further information.
Prerequisites: An introductory course in Sociology.

Course usage information

SOC-292. Special Topics in Sociology. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
An examination of selected topics or issues in sociology. Topics may differ each time the course is offered. Students should consult the department chair for further information.
Prerequisites: An introductory course in Sociology.