Science and Mathematics

Associate in Science Degree

These curricula emphasize the physical and biological sciences and mathematics, as well as the liberal arts. They are designed for transfer to baccalaureate programs in mathematics and the sciences and are appropriate for students who plan careers in mathematics, biology, chemistry, physics, teaching, medicine, dentistry, allied health and other scientific programs. All programs include general education courses and advanced mathematics and science courses appropriate to the transfer major.

Options within the Science and Mathematics program include Biology, Chemistry and Mathematics. Students should consult with an academic advisor to select the curriculum which is appropriate for their transfer and career goals, as well as preparation for medical, dental and chiropractic schools. Transfer to science majors in four-year curricula which are more specialized, such as pharmacy and astronomy, can be accomplished with these programs with careful advisement.

Students may consult with the Biology and Chemistry chair for specific information and assignment to an academic advisor for options in Chemistry and Biology. Students interested in the Mathematics options may consult with the Mathematics chair.

Due to continual program revisions mandated by the accrediting agencies and/or changes in state-mandated requirements, students should consult with their academic advisors when selecting courses.

Premedical, Predental, Preveterinary Majors

Students preparing for medical, dental or veterinary medical schools should select the Chemistry major or the Biology major, preprofessional track. These schools require General Biology I and II, General Chemistry I and II, Organic Chemistry I and II, General Physics I and II, and mathematics, generally through Calculus I or further, to support these. Since there are prerequisites for these courses, it is important to see an academic advisor early in the process to plan the entire sequence of courses. Chiropractic, occupational therapy, physical therapy and physician's assistant programs should major in Biology and confer with an academic advisor to select the correct track and selection of courses.

Students with a previous non-science degree who plan to take only the science courses necessary for these schools should also see an advisor since proper sequencing can save time in the completion of the courses. Additionally, by transferring general education courses from the previous degree, a student can complete an A.S. degree in Chemistry or Biology without taking any additional courses. For further information, contact the Department of Biology and Chemistry.

Pharmacy

Pharmacy programs are often separate schools within a university. The appropriate major to prepare for pharmacy is Chemistry with appropriately selected courses. Students should consult with an academic advisor to select the correct sequencing of courses.

Biology

An Option within Science and Mathematics

(P2160)

Note: Biology majors requiring developmental courses in Mathematics must complete MAT-016 Intermediate Algebra prior to taking courses in Biology and Chemistry.

Biology is one of the most rapidly developing sciences today. A tremendous rate of expansion in the understanding of life processes, along with unprecedented growth in medical and environmental technologies, has resulted in a growing need for trained professionals in new, as well as traditional, fields. This curriculum, with each of its five tracks, reflects this expanding science and its related technologies. It is a liberal arts program with emphasis on the sciences and mathematics. Students planning to transfer to baccalaureate programs or professional schools take courses that either parallel those required in the first two years of most baccalaureate programs in biology or those required for entry into the most popular professional programs.

Because of the complexity of career options and the diversity in requirements of baccalaureate and professional schools, it is recommended that students  work closely with their academic advisors. Students who are preparing for medical, dental or veterinary medical schools should see an academic advisor in the Department of Biology immediately to plan their courses and sequencing of courses. The appropriate major is either Biology, preprofessional track, or Chemistry. Students who have a previous nonscience degree should be able to complete either of these degrees by transferring general education courses and taking only the sciences required for the medical schools. College programs may differ widely in course offerings for various biology majors. In order to achieve maximum transfer of credits, it is absolutely essential that students speak to their academic advisors and consult the transfer institution regarding specific curriculum requirements.

Articulation Agreements

Students should check with the Transfer Office about articulation agreements with this program.

Students considering a career in teaching should read about the County College of Morris Teacher Education Specialization in Biology.

The following are tracks within the major for purposes of advisement. Dissection is required in certain mandated courses.

Traditional

Track 1 is the traditional curriculum which, because of its general scope, is anticipated to continue to satisfy the needs of the majority of students. Students in this program can continue in virtually any direction, although in certain circumstances they may have to make up credits upon transferring.

Traditional - Track 1

General Education Foundation
Communication6
English Composition I
English Composition II
Math-Science-Technology11
Precalculus
Biology Elective
Math-Science-Technology Elective
Social Science3
Choose from General Education course list
Humanities3
Choose from General Education course list
Social Science or Humanities3
Choose from General Education course list
General Education Electives6
Choose from General Education course list
General Education Foundation Credits32
Biology Traditional Core
BIO-121General Biology I4
BIO-122General Biology II4
CHM-125General Chemistry I - Lecture3
CHM-126General Chemistry I - Laboratory1
CHM-127General Chemistry II - Lecture3
CHM-128General Chemistry II - Laboratory1
Biology Elective4
MAT-124Statistics3-4
or MAT-131 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I
Free Electives9
Biology Traditional Core Credits32-33
Total Credits64-65

Students should consult with their academic advisors when selecting free electives.

Science courses completed by students prior to entering the Biology option must be less than seven years old. If the science courses exceed the seven-year limit, students can prove their competency by testing or they must retake the courses.

Health Related

Track 2 is intended for those students who are preparing to transfer directly to professional schools including occupational therapy and physician’s assistant programs. However, this program is not suitable for students wishing to apply to programs in medicine, dentistry, optometry or podiatry, which require a more traditional selection of courses. This track has a more narrow selection of courses than Tracks 1 and 3, and, thus, may restrict transfer options. It is essential that applicants to this program be accepted only with the approval of their faculty advisors.

Health Related - Track 2

General Education Foundation
Communication6
English Composition I
English Composition II
Math-Science-Technology11
Precalculus
Biology Elective
Math-Science-Technology Elective
Social Science3
Choose from General Education course list
Humanities3
Choose from General Education course list
Social Science or Humanities3
Choose from General Education course list
General Education Electives6
Choose from General Education course list
General Education Foundation Credits32
Biology Health Related Core
BIO-121General Biology I4
BIO-122General Biology II4
CHM-125General Chemistry I - Lecture3
CHM-126General Chemistry I - Laboratory1
CHM-127General Chemistry II - Lecture3
CHM-128General Chemistry II - Laboratory1
BIO-101Anatomy and Physiology I4
BIO-102Anatomy and Physiology II4
MAT-124Statistics3-4
or MAT-131 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I
Free Elective4
Biology Health Related Core Credits31-32
Total Credits63-64

Students should consult with their academic advisors when selecting the Biology elective.

Science courses completed by students prior to entering the Biology option must be less than seven years old. If the science courses exceed the seven-year limit, students can prove their competency by testing or they must retake the courses.

Preprofessional/Scientific

Track 3 is intended to meet the needs of those whose math and science skills are above average and who hope to transfer to the more competitive baccalaureate programs, professional schools or medical, veterinary or dental schools. Students wishing to be admitted into this track can do so only with the approval of their faculty advisors.

Preprofessional/Scientific - Track 3

General Education Foundation
Communication6
English Composition I
English Composition II
Math-Science-Technology11
Precalculus
Biology Elective
Math-Science-Technology Elective
Social Science3
Choose from General Education course list
Humanities3
Choose from General Education course list
Social Science or Humanities3
General Psychology
General Education Electives6
Choose from General Education course list
General Education Foundation Credits32
Biology Preprofessional Core
BIO-121General Biology I4
BIO-122General Biology II4
CHM-125General Chemistry I - Lecture3
CHM-126General Chemistry I - Laboratory1
CHM-127General Chemistry II - Lecture3
CHM-128General Chemistry II - Laboratory1
CHM-231Organic Chemistry I - Lecture3
CHM-232Organic Chemistry I - Laboratory1
CHM-233Organic Chemistry II - Lecture3
CHM-234Organic Chemistry II - Laboratory1
MAT-131Analytic Geometry and Calculus I4
Free Elective4
Biology Preprofessional Core Credits32
Total Credits64

Students should consult with their academic advisors when selecting free electives.

Science courses completed by students prior to entering the Biology option must be less than seven years old. If the science courses exceed the seven-year limit, students can prove their competency by testing or they must retake the courses.

Environmental

Track 4 is designed to meet the needs of those who clearly are interested in a career in the environmental field. These programs are becoming increasingly more specialized in the array of courses required in the first two years. For this reason, students wishing to be admitted into this track will require the approval of their faculty advisors.

Environmental - Track 4

General Education Foundation
Communication6
English Composition I
English Composition II
Math-Science-Technology11
Precalculus
Biology Elective
Math-Science-Technology Elective
Social Science3
Choose from General Education course list
Humanities3
Choose from General Education course list
Social Science or Humanities3
General Psychology
General Education Electives6
Choose from General Education course list
General Education Foundation Credits32
Environmental Science Core
BIO-121General Biology I4
BIO-122General Biology II4
BIO-202Ecology4
CHM-125General Chemistry I - Lecture3
CHM-126General Chemistry I - Laboratory1
CHM-127General Chemistry II - Lecture3
CHM-128General Chemistry II - Laboratory1
MAT-124Statistics3
Free Electives9
Environmental Science Core Credits32
Total Credits64

Students should consult with their academic advisors when selecting free electives.

Science courses completed by students prior to entering the Biology option must be less than seven years old. If the science courses exceed the seven-year limit, students can prove their competency by testing or they must retake the courses.

Nutrition

Track 5 is designed to meet the needs of students who are interested in a career in nutrition (e.g., heath and wellness, fitness or sports related nutrition).  The track is intended for those students who are preparing to transfer directly to a four-year school with programs that offer a Registered Dietitian (RD) credential or Dietetic Technician, Registered (DTR) certification.  The courses required for the first two years are very specific.  Therefore, students wishing to be admitted into this track must meet with and get the approval of their academic faculty advisor.  

Nutrition - Track 5

General Education Foundation
Communication6
English Composition I
English Composition II
Math-Science-Technology11
Statistics
Human Biology
Introductory Chemistry Lecture
Introductory Chemistry Laboratory
Social Science3
Principles of Economics I Macroeconomics
Humanities3
Choose from General Education course list
Social Science or Humanities3
Choose from General Education course list
General Education Electives6
General Psychology
Humanities, Social Science, Communication or Language
General Education Foundation Credits32
Biology Nutrition Core
BIO-121General Biology I4
BIO-122General Biology II4
BIO-215Microbiology4
HOS-100Serv-Safe Food Handling1
HOS-105Food Science and Nutrition3
CHM-210Essentials of Organic Chemistry4
Free Electives12
Biology Nutrition Core Credits32
Total Credits64

Chemistry

An Option within Science and Mathematics

(P2152)

Note: Chemistry majors requiring developmental courses in Mathematics must complete MAT-016 Intermediate Algebra prior to taking courses in Biology and Chemistry.

Chemistry is a versatile subject area and the pursuit of a career in chemistry can be a most intellectually satisfying experience. No other basic science touches and shapes as many aspects of modern society as chemistry. From soft contact lenses and synthetic blood to alternative fuel sources and advances in medicine and biotechnology, the study of chemistry has provided the solution to complex problems and has improved the quality of all phases of human life.

The fact that chemists at all levels of education find a market for their skills and knowledge in every employment area is further demonstration of the scope of the science of chemistry. Chemists provide the backbone for manufacturing industries, such as pharmaceuticals, laboratories, environmental protection and for government positions in regulatory agencies.

Chemistry and biochemistry are the strongest preparation for professional schools in the health-related disciplines, such as medicine, dentistry and pharmacy, as well as the fields of environmental science, polymers and geology.

The Chemistry program at County College of Morris is designed to provide students with a strong foundation in all areas of modern chemistry. The core courses required for the A.S. degree prepare the student to transfer and attain a B.S. or B.A. degree, to attend health-related professional schools in medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, physical therapy and chiropractic, or to start a career in chemistry. The degree is also applicable for those students interested in the applications of chemistry to environmental problems. Students who are preparing for medical, dental or veterinary schools should see an academic advisor in the Department of Biology and Chemistry early in the process to plan their courses and sequencing of courses. Students who have a previous non-science degree should be able to complete this program by transferring general education courses and taking only the sciences required for medical schools.

The department is staffed with a dedicated teaching faculty, and many have industrial or medical experience. State-of-the-art equipment is used in all laboratory courses to maximize the students' practical hands-on experience.

Students should consult with their advisors to ensure the proper sequencing of required and elective courses. Correct advisement is absolutely necessary to assure transferability.

The study of chemistry opens doors to satisfying careers and to a professional life in which the tendency to ask “why” can lead to rewarding endeavors.

Articulation Agreements

Students should check with the Transfer Office about articulation agreements with this program.

Students considering a career in teaching should read about the County College of Morris Teacher Education Specialization in Chemistry.

General Education Foundation
Communication6
English Composition I
English Composition II
Math-Science-Technology11
Precalculus
Biology or Physics Elective
Math/Science/Technology Elective
Social Science3
Choose from General Education course list
Humanities3
Choose from General Education course list
Social Science or Humanities3
Choose from General Education course list
General Education Electives6
Choose from General Education course list
General Education Foundation Credits32
Chemistry Core
CHM-125General Chemistry I - Lecture3
CHM-126General Chemistry I - Laboratory1
CHM-127General Chemistry II - Lecture3
CHM-128General Chemistry II - Laboratory1
CHM-231Organic Chemistry I - Lecture3
CHM-232Organic Chemistry I - Laboratory1
CHM-233Organic Chemistry II - Lecture3
CHM-234Organic Chemistry II - Laboratory1
Biology or Physics Elective4
MAT-131Analytic Geometry and Calculus I4
Restricted Elective4
Free Elective4
Chemistry Core Credits32
Total Credits64

Students should consult with their academic advisors when selecting free and restricted electives.

Science courses completed by students prior to entering the Chemistry option must be less than seven years old. If the science courses exceed the seven-year limit, students can prove their competency by testing or they must retake the courses.

Mathematics

An Option within Science and Mathematics

(P2150)

Articulation Agreements

Students should check with the Transfer Office about articulation agreements with this program.

Students considering a career in teaching should read about the County College of Morris Teacher Education Specialization in Mathematics.

General Education Foundation
Communication6
English Composition I
English Composition II
Math-Science-Technology11
Restricted Laboratory Science
Technology Elective
Restricted Laboratory Science
Social Science3
Choose from General Education course list
Humanities3
Choose from General Education course list
Social Science or Humanities3
Choose from General Education course list
General Education Electives6
Choose from General Education course list
General Education Foundation Credits32
Mathematics Core
Select from following Mathematics course groups15-16
Precalculus
Analytic Geometry and Calculus I
Analytic Geometry and Calculus II
Calculus III
OR
Analytic Geometry and Calculus I
Analytic Geometry and Calculus II
Calculus III
Differential Equations
Free Electives10
Select one of the following:3-4
Math Elective
Computer Programming for Engineers
Mathematics Core Credits28-30
Total Credits60-62

Students should consult with their academic advisors when selecting the Math and free electives. 

Dr. Maria Isaza
Chairperson, Biology and Chemistry
Associate Professor, Biology
Ph. D., Biomedical Sciences, University of Medicine and
Dentistry of New Jersey
B.S., College of Saint Elizabeth
A.S., County College of Morris
AAS, County College of Morris
SH 208   973-328-5360   misaza@ccm.edu

Christine Kelly
Assistant Chairperson, Biology and Chemistry
Assistant Professor, Biology
Assistant Chairperson, Biology & Chemistry
M.S., B.S. William Paterson University
A.S., County College of Morris
SH 205   973-328-5371   ckelly@ccm.edu

Alexis Thurman
Chairperson, Mathematics
Professor, Mathematics
MBA, Seton Hall University
M.S., New Jersey Institute of Technology
B.A., Rutgers-The State University of NJ 
SH 309   973-328-5733   athurman@ccm.edu

Deborah Poetsch
Assistant Chair, Mathematics
Assistant Professor, Mathematics
M.S.Ed., Queens College of the City University of New York
B.A., State University of New York-Geneseo
SH 311     973-328-5764     dpoetsch@ccm.edu

Doreen Sabella
Assistant Chairperson, Mathematics
Associate Professor, Mathematics
M.S., B.S., Seton Hall University
SH 211     973-328-5708     dsabella@ccm.edu

Dr. John Berger
Associate Professor, Chemistry
Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University
M.S., Stevens Institute of Technology
B.S., Stevens Institute of Technology
SH 207     973-328-5731     jberger@ccm.edu

Dr. Teresa S. Birrer
Assistant Professor, Biology
Ph.D., University of New Hampshire
B.A., Mount Holyoke College
SH 209     973-328-2497     tbirrer@ccm.edu

Caitlin Burns
Assistant Professor, Biology
M.S., Montclair State University
B.S., Rowan University
SH 250   973-328-5373     cburns@ccm.edu

Catherine Chambers
Assistant Professor, Mathematics
M.S., State University of New York at Albany
B.S., State University of New York at Albany
SH 201     973-328-5715     cchambers@ccm.edu

Lee Collins
Assistant Professor, Mathematics
M.A., Rowan University
B.S., Rowan University
SH 215     973-328-5714    ncollins@ccm.edu 

Anthony DiStasio
Special Projects, Biotechnology/Chemical Technology
Assistant Professor, Chemistry
M.S., Wagner College
B.A., Marist College
SH 207     973-328-5339     adistasio@ccm.edu

Dr. Gregory Erianne
Associate Professor, Biology
Ph.D., University of Medicine & Dentistry of New Jersey
M.S., University of Medicine & Dentistry of New Jersey
B.S., Rutgers University
B.A., Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
SH 205     973-328-5377     gerianne@ccm.edu

Kelly Fitzpatrick
Assistant Professor, Mathematics
M.A. Columbia University
B. A., State University of New York – Geneseo
SH 201     973-328-5765     kfitzpatrick@ccm.edu

Keri A. Flanagan
Assistant Professor, Chemistry
M.S., University of North Carolina
B.S., Montclair State University
SH 207     973-328-5732     kflanagan@ccm.edu

Samantha E. Gigliotti
Instructor, Biology
M.S., East Stroudsburg University
B.S., East Stroudsburg University
SH 250     973-328-5370    sgigliotti@ccm.edu

Dr. Jason Hudzik
Assistant Professor, Chemistry
Ph.D., New Jersey Institute of Technology
M.S., New Jersey Institute of Technology
B.S., New Jersey Institute of Technology
A.S., County College of Morris
SH 250     973-328-5222     jhudzik@ccm.edu

Dr. William C. Hunter, Jr.
Professor, Biology
D.M.H., Drew University
M.A.T., Fairleigh Dickinson University
B.S., Fairleigh Dickinson University
SH 250     973-328-5372     whunter@ccm.edu

Janet Johannessen
Professor, Chemistry
M.S., Fairleigh Dickinson University
B.S., Fairleigh Dickinson University
A.A., County College of Morris
SH 209     973-328-5358     jjohannessen@ccm.edu

Jeffrey C. Jones
Professor, Mathematics
M.A., Montclair State University
M.S., Montclair State University
B.S., Hampden-Sydney College
SH 213     973-328-5718     jjones@ccm.edu

Jenifer Martin
Associate Professor, Biology
M.S., Yale University
B.S., California State University, Fullerton
SH 207     973-328-5357     jlmartin@ccm.edu

Helen G. Mastrobuoni
Professor, Biology
M.S., Fairleigh Dickinson University
B.S., Fairleigh Dickinson University
SH 209     973-328-5374     hmastrobuoni@ccm.edu

Dr. Roger McCoach
Professor, Mathematics
Ph.D., New York University
M.A., State University of New York (Stony Brook)
B.S., Clarkson University
SH 213     973-328-5712     rmccoach@ccm.edu

Meimee Persau
Associate Professor, Mathematics
M.S.E.E., Stevens Institute of Technology
B.S.E.E., Stevens Institute of Technology
SH 201     973-328-5769     mpersau@ccm.edu

Dorothy M. Salinas
Assistant Professor, Biology
M.S., University of Nebraska
B.S., The College of New Jersey
SH 205     973-328-5375     dsalinas@ccm.edu

Dr. Jorge Sarmiento
Professor, Mathematics
D.A., University of Miami
M.A., University of Puerto Rico
BEE, University of Gijon (E.I.T.I.) Spain
B.S., International Institute of the Americas, Puerto Rico
AAS, County College of Morris
SH 215     973-328-5719     jsarmiento@ccm.edu

Kathryn Shuck
Assistant Professor, Mathematics
MBA, Indiana University
M.S., California Institute of Technology
B.S., Purdue University
SH 215     973-328-5709     kshuck@ccm.edu

Deanne Stigliano
Instructor, Mathematics
M.S., Montclair State University
B.A., Caldwell College
SH 311   973-328-5706   dstigliano@ccm.edu

Dr. Loryn Stoler
Assistant Professor, Chemistry
Ph.D., University of Maryland, Baltimore County
M.Ch.E., B.S., Johns Hopkins University
SH 205     973-328-5376     lstoler@ccm.edu

Susan Winston
Associate Professor, Mathematics
M.A., Howard University
B.S., Morgan State College
SH 211     973-328-5717     swinston@ccm.edu 

Courses

Course usage information

BIO-100. Elements in Biology. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
A foundation providing necessary skills and concepts needed to pursue the biology major. The course stresses skill development in areas such as communication, classification, inquiry, mathematical measurement, data analysis and report writing. Skills then are applied to the study of the cell cycle and diverse life processes.
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

BIO-101. Anatomy and Physiology I. 4 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs, LAB 3 hrs
The structure and function of the human organism is studied. Special emphasis is given to interrelationships of organs and organ systems. Cellular morphology and function are included for an appreciation of the adult form. The student is introduced to basic chemistry, the cell, basic tissues, the skeletal, muscular and nervous systems. Dissection is required as part of the laboratory syllabus. All remedial courses must be completed prior to taking this course.
Prerequisites: Placement basis or ENG-007 or ENG-022 or ENG-025 and MAT-016
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

BIO-102. Anatomy and Physiology II. 4 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs, LAB 3 hrs
A continuation of Anatomy and Physiology I. The circulatory, respiratory, digestive, urinary, endocrine and reproductive systems are studied. Dissection is required as part of the laboratory syllabus. All remedial courses must be completed prior to taking this course.
Prerequisites: BIO-101 (Minimum grade of C)
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

BIO-116. Animal Control Officer's Training Course. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
Preparation for New Jersey State Certification as an Animal Control Officer. Topics include legal authority for animal control (federal, state, local); courtroom procedures; animal behavior, capture and handling; disease recognition, prevention and control; shelter operations; and community relations.

Course usage information

BIO-118. Biomedical Ethics. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
This course introduces students to major ethical issues in areas of biomedicine in contemporary society. The focal point of the course is a process for ethical reasoning and ethical decision making.Students identify ethical problems, assess information relevant to decisions, identify stakeholders affected by decisions, recognize competing values, consider options, make decisions and realize the consequences of decisions. The process is applied to issues in such fields as genetics, death and dying, reproduction, public policy and medical decision making. This course does not fulfill a laboratory science requirement.

Course usage information

BIO-121. General Biology I. 4 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs, LAB 3 hrs
An introduction to the biological sciences through a study of concepts basic to the biology science major. Topics include the fundamentals of chemistry, cell structure and function, and the nature of biological molecules, bioenergetics, protein synthesis and photosynthesis. Dissection is required as part of the laboratory syllabus. All remedial courses must be completed prior to taking this course.
Prerequisites: Placement basis or MAT-016 and ENG-007 or ENG-025 or ENG-022
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

BIO-122. General Biology II. 4 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs, LAB 3 hrs
A continuation of General Biology I. Topics include homeostasis, animal reproduction, embryonic development, genetics, ecology and evolution. Dissection is required as part of the laboratory syllabus. All remedial courses must be completed prior to taking this course.
Prerequisites: BIO-121 or BIO-180 (Minimum grade of C)
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

BIO-123. Cell Biology. 4 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs, LAB 3 hrs
Fall semester only. An introduction to the fundamentals of cellular biology. Topics covered are the nature of biologically important molecules, molecular synthesis, energetics, cellular structure and function, cell reproduction, heredity, and basic laboratory techniques for cellular study. All remedial courses must be completed prior to taking this course.
Prerequisites: Placement basis or MAT-016 and ENG-007 or ENG-025 or ENG-022
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

BIO-127. Biology of Environmental Concerns. 4 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs, LAB 3 hrs
Designed for the non-science major. A survey of ecological issues from a variety of perspectives. The course provides an awareness of environmental problems, a knowledge of cause-and-effect relationships of diverse activities on this planet and a basis for making informed judgments about the potential solutions to environmental problems. Major topics include the roots of our environmental problems, introductory concepts in ecology, human population dynamics and control, food resources and world hunger, renewable and nonrenewable energy resources, mineral resources and solid waste, wild plant and animal resources, water resources, air pollution, water pollution, pesticides and pest control, economics, politics and the environment, world views, and ethics and the environment. This course fulfills the general education laboratory science requirement.
Prerequisites: Placement basis or ENG-007 or ENG-022 or ENG-025
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

BIO-132. Concepts in Biology. 4 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs, LAB 3 hrs
Designed for the non-science major. A basic introduction to the study of biological science. Topics include the hierarchy of organization, life processes, cell theory, human genetics, theories of evolution, biochemistry and some principles of ecology. This course fulfills the general education laboratory science requirement.
Prerequisites: Placement basis or ENG-007 or ENG-022 or ENG-025
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

BIO-133. Human Biology. 4 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs, LAB 3 hrs
Designed for the non-science major. An introduction to the body systems and the factors which affect human physiology. Lectures include the basic anatomy and physiology of the major systems plus discussion topics emphasizing nutrition, exercise, sexuality, genetic engineering and recent advances in biotechnology. This course fulfills the general education laboratory science requirement.
Prerequisites: Placement basis or ENG-007 or ENG-022 or ENG-025
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

BIO-180. General Biology I - Honors. 4 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs, LAB 3 hrs
Fall Semester only. This is an introduction to the biological sciences through a study of principles and concepts basic to the major discipline of biology. Topics include fundamentals of chemistry, cell structure and function, the nature of biological molecules, energetics, synthesis and the morphology and physiology of animals and plants. Dissection is required as part of the laboratory syllabus. Lecture and laboratory use an investigatory approach which will emphasize both written and oral communication skills.
Prerequisites: Placement basis or MAT-016 and ENG-007 or ENG-022 or ENG-025 and permission of department chair or honors advisor
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

BIO-181. General Biology II - Honors. 4 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs, LAB 3 hrs
Spring Semester only. A continuation of BIO-180 General Biology I Honors. Topics include homeostasis, animal reproduction and embryonic development, genetics, ecology, and evolution. Dissection is required as part of the laboratory syllabus. Lecture and laboratory use an investigatory approach that emphasizes both written and oral communication skills.
Prerequisites: BIO-180 or BIO-121 and permission of honors advisor
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

BIO-201. Genetics. 4 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs, LAB 3 hrs
Spring Semester only. Provides the student with a broad knowledge of genetics from the molecular to the organismal level. Topics covered include the molecular and Mendelian concepts of heredity and their relationship to cell function, development, population changes and evolution,and biotechnology. Laboratory exercises emphasize a variety of techniques and skills used in genetic research and testing.
Prerequisites: BIO-121 and BIO-122 or BIO-180 and BIO-181(Minimum grade of C required for all prerequisites)
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

BIO-202. Ecology. 4 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs, LAB 3 hrs
Fall Semester only. This course introduces the basic fundamentals of ecology, the study of the interrelationships between organisms and their environment. Topics include an introduction to ecosystem structure and function, abiotic factors in ecosystems, energy flow and mineral cycling, population and evolutionary ecology, community ecology, a comprehensive survey of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, and human ecology. Laboratories and field trips are designed to introduce students to techniques used in basic ecological research.
Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C required for either BIO-121 or BIO-180 or LHT-110
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

BIO-215. Microbiology. 4 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs, LAB 3 hrs
A comprehensive study of microorganisms, including viruses, bacteria, fungi, protozoa and algae. Topics covered include microbial anatomy, physiology, genetics, ecology and methods of control. Research methods and modern immunological concepts also are discussed. Laboratory exercises in basic microbiological techniques and the study of living microorganisms are designed to supplement the theory presented.
Prerequisites: Placement basis or ENG-007 or ENG-022 or ENG-025 and BIO-101 or BIO-121 or BIO-123 or BIO-180 (minimum grade of C) and CHM-117 or CHM-125 and CHM-126 (minimum grade of C)
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

BIO-223. Cell and Molecular Biology. 4 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs, LAB 3 hrs
A comprehensive study of biological molecules and their functions. Emphasis will be placed on the mechanism and regulation of macromolecule synthesis. Laboratory exercises will focus on instrumentation and techniques used in biological research.
Prerequisites: BIO-121 or BIO-123 and CHM-125 and CHM-126 Minimum grade of C required for all prerequisites
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

BIO-226. Cooperative Work Experience - Biology. 3 Credits.

COOP 3 hrs
This course provides selected students enrolled in the Biotechnology or Biology Major with job-oriented laboratory training and practical work experience in a paid work environment prior to career employment. Students work a minimum of 135 hours. Students desiring to participate in this experience should make their interest known to the department chairperson by the end of their second semester. Offered Fall, Spring and Summer, day.
Prerequisites: Fourth semester status as a Biotechnology or Biology major and permission of department chair.

Course usage information

BIO-228. Internship Work Experience - Biology. 3 Credits.

COOP 3 hrs
This course provides selected students enrolled in the Biotechnology or Biology Major with job-oriented laboratory training and practical work experience in an unpaid work environment prior to career employment. Students work a minimum of 135 hours. Students desiring to participate in this experience should make their interest known to the department chairperson by the end of their second semester. Offered Fall, Spring and Summer, day.
Prerequisites: Fourth semester status as a Biotechnology or Biology major and permission of department chair.

Course usage information

BIO-233. Independent Study in Biology. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
An opportunity for selected students to participate in biological research under close supervision of the biology faculty. Interested students should make their interest known early in the prior semester to the department chair, who will familiarize the students with criteria for selection and the steps to be taken to gain entrance to this course. This course does not fulfill any of the science requirements in biology but is offered as a free elective.
Prerequisites: Permission of department chair
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

BIO-274. Pathophysiology. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
Pathophysiology is a course which studies the physiological alterations associated with common disease processes which affect human beings across the lifespan. Common diseases of the major organ systems are covered as well as such general issues as infection, neoplasm, inflammation, fluid and electrolyte imbalance, trauma, and shock.
Prerequisites: BIO-101 and BIO-102 and CHM-117 Minimum grade of C required for all prerequisites.

Course usage information

BIO-295. Special Topics in Biology. 4 Credits.

LECT 4 hrs
An examination of selected topics or issues in biology. Topics may differ each time the course is offered. Students should consult the department chair for further information.
Prerequisites: An introductory course in Biology and permission of department chair
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

CHM-100. Elements of Chemistry. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
A one-semester, introductory 3-credit, non-laboratory course designed for students with little or no background in chemistry. Emphasis is on preparing students for General Chemistry and Introductory Chemistry courses. The course encompasses chemical principles and calculations with a brief review of algebra.
Prerequisites: MAT-016 - minimum grade of C required.

Course usage information

CHM-105. Forensic Science. 4 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs, LAB 3 hrs
Designed for the non-science major. An introduction to the applications of the physical and biological sciences in analyzing and evaluating physical evidence as related to crime and the law.
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

CHM-117. Introductory Chemistry Lecture. 3 Credits.

RECI 1 hr, LECT 3 hrs
An introduction to the basic concepts of inorganic, organic and biochemistry. The emphasis is on the relationship of these concepts to physiological chemistry and living systems. All remedial courses listed must be completed prior to taking this course.
Prerequisites: Placement basis or MAT-016 (minimum grade of C) and ENG-025 or ENG-022 or ENG-007
Corequisites: CHM-118.

Course usage information

CHM-118. Introductory Chemistry Laboratory. 1 Credit.

LAB 1 hr
Laboratory experiments illustrate principles studied in CHM-117. Required for Landscape and Horticultural Technology, liberal arts majors and some Allied Health programs.
Prerequisites: Placement basis or MAT-016 (minimum grade of C) and ENG-025 or ENG-022 or ENG-007
Corequisites: CHM-117
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

CHM-125. General Chemistry I - Lecture. 3 Credits.

RECI 1 hr, LECT 3 hrs
A study of the fundamental principles of chemistry and their application to chemical reactions. Topics include the structure of the atom, concepts of matter, mass relationships for pure substances and chemical reactions, solutions, electronic structure, the chemical bond, nuclear reactions and gases. All remedial courses listed must be completed prior to taking this course.
Prerequisites: Placement College Level Math test or MAT-110 (minimum grade of C) and Placement basis or ENG-025 or ENG-022 or ENG-007
Corequisites: CHM-126.

Course usage information

CHM-126. General Chemistry I - Laboratory. 1 Credit.

LAB 3 hrs
Laboratory experiments illustrate principles studied in CHM-125. All remedial courses listed must be completed prior to taking this course.
Prerequisites: Placement College Level Math test or MAT-110 (minimum grade of C) and Placement basis or ENG-025 or ENG-022 or ENG-007
Corequisites: CHM-125
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

CHM-127. General Chemistry II - Lecture. 3 Credits.

RECI 1 hr, LECT 3 hrs
A continuation of General Chemistry I with emphasis on chemical equilibrium and energy changes in chemical reactions. Also included are acids, bases, buffers, chemical thermodynamics, kinetics, qualitative analysis and electrochemistry. All remedial courses listed must be completed prior to taking this course.
Prerequisites: CHM-125 (minimum grade of C), CHM-126 and placement basis or ENG-025 or ENG-022 or ENG-007
Corequisites: CHM-128.

Course usage information

CHM-128. General Chemistry II - Laboratory. 1 Credit.

LAB 3 hrs
Laboratory experiments illustrate principles studied in CHM-127. All remedial courses listed must be completed prior to taking this course.
Prerequisites: CHM-125 and CHM-126 (minimum grade of C required for both) and placement basis or ENG-007 or ENG-022 or ENG-025
Corequisites: CHM-127
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

CHM-136. Environmental Regulation. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
This course is an overview of critical environmental issues encountered by industry from a regulatory perspective. Various federal and New Jersey state regulations pertaining to air, water, hazardous waste and hazardous materials management are investigated. Students acquire knowledge on how industry complies with the diversity of regulatory requirements. Students are exposed to examples of instances where industrial non-compliance with applicable regulations has led to deleterious environmental and occupational health effects. Current issues and their significance to environmental and occupational health are discussed including, Clean Water Act, Clean Air Act, Environmental Cleanup and Responsibility Act (ECRA), Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA), Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA), Asbestos, indoor air quality and underground storage tanks.
Prerequisites: BIO-123 and CHM-125.

Course usage information

CHM-204. Principles of Occupational Health and Safety. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
A survey course providing an overview of industrial hygiene and the roles that the industrial hygiene professional plays in recognizing, evaluating and controlling hazards in the workplace. This course provides an introduction to the qualitative and quantitative issues essential to comprehend occupational safety and health principles. Case studies and hands-on exercises are utilized to stress key concepts.

Course usage information

CHM-210. Essentials of Organic Chemistry. 4 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs, LAB 3 hrs
Summer Semester only. This course is the study of the basic principles of structure, reactivity and nomenclature in organic chemistry. The laboratory develops basic work skills in the types of experiments performed in a typical organic chemistry laboratory with emphasis on the safe handling of laboratory chemicals and the proper presentation of experimental results.
Prerequisites: CHM-117 and CHM-118 or CHM-127 and CHM-128 (minimum grade of C for all prerequisites)
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

CHM-212. Biochemistry. 4 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs, LAB 3 hrs
An introduction to physiological chemistry. Lectures cover amino acids, proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, molecular genetics, energetics and metabolic pathways. Lab reinforces concepts covered in lecture. All remedial courses listed must be completed prior to taking this course.
Prerequisites: Placement basis or ENG-025 or ENG-022 or ENG-007 and CHM-117 (minimum grade of C) or CHM-125 (minimum grade of C)
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

CHM-219. Quantitative Chemical Analysis. 5 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs, LAB 6 hrs
Fall Semester only. Principles of modern quantitative methods in chemistry, including the study of chemical equilibria, solubility, acidity and complex formation. The laboratory work involves practical applications of inorganic and organic analysis including volumetric, gravimetric,chromatographic and instrumental techniques. Emphasis is placed on the statistical treatment of data and report writing. All remedial courses listed must be completed prior to taking this course.
Prerequisites: Placement basis or ENG-025 or ENG-022 or ENG-007 and CHM-127 (minimum grade of C) or equivalent
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

CHM-220. Instrumental Methods of Analysis. 5 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs, LAB 6 hrs
Spring Semester only. This survey course covers theory and applications of modern instrumentation utilized to solve problems in chemical analysis. Laboratory work involves hands-on experience utilizing instruments such as gas(GC), liquid(HPLC) and ion chromatography; spectrophotometric methods including visible, ultraviolet, infrared(FTIR)and atomic absorption; ICP and other methods, including ion selective electrode methods; and electrophoretic methods including capillary electrophoresis(HPCE). Emphasis is placed on the comparison of methods, the collection and interpretation of laboratory data, technical report writing and record keeping. All remedial courses listed must be completed prior to taking this course.
Prerequisites: Placement basis or ENG-025 or ENG-022 or ENG-007 and CHM-127 or equivalent (minimum grade of C)
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

CHM-228. Cooperative Work Experience - Chemistry. 3 Credits.

COOP 3 hrs
This course provides selected students enrolled in the Chemical Technology or Chemistry programs with job-oriented laboratory training and practical work experience in a paid work environment prior to career employment. Students work a minimum of 135 hours. Students desiring to participate in this experience should make their interest known to the department chair by the end of their second semester. Offered Fall, Spring and Summer, day.
Prerequisites: Fourth semester status as a Chemical Technology or Chemistry major and permission of department chair.

Course usage information

CHM-229. Internship Work Experience - Chemistry. 3 Credits.

COOP 3 hrs
This course provides selected students enrolled in the Chemical Technology or Chemistry Major with job-oriented laboratory training and practical work experience in an unpaid work environment prior to career employment. Students work a minimum of 135 hours. Students desiring to participate in this experience should make their interest known to the department chairperson by the end of their second semester. Offered Fall, Spring and Summer, day.
Prerequisites: Fourth semester status as a Chemical Technology or Chemistry major and permission of department chair.

Course usage information

CHM-231. Organic Chemistry I - Lecture. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
This course is an introduction to the chemistry of carbon compounds.Topics include a study of the fundamental concepts of structure and stereochemistry, physical properties of organic compounds and a functional approach to the interpretation of organic reactions. This course is designed for majors in Biology, Chemistry, Pharmacy, and for students preparing for medical, dental and veterinary schools. All remedial courses listed must be completed prior to taking this course.
Prerequisites: Placement basis or ENG-025 or ENG-022 or ENG-007 and CHM-127 (minimum grade of C) and CHM-128 (minimum grade of C)
Corequisites: CHM-232.

Course usage information

CHM-232. Organic Chemistry I - Laboratory. 1 Credit.

LAB 3 hrs
Laboratory experiments stress techniques involved in the synthesis and purification of typical organic compounds using both macroscale and microscale techniques. All remedial courses listed must be completed prior to taking this course.
Prerequisites: Placement basis or ENG-025 or ENG-022 or ENG-007 and CHM-127 (minimum grade of C) and CHM-128 (minimum grade of C)
Corequisites: CHM-231
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

CHM-233. Organic Chemistry II - Lecture. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
A continuation of the study of organic compounds with further study of functional groups, reaction mechanisms including nucleophilic substitution and elimination reactions, and infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. All remedial courses listed must be completed prior to taking this course.
Prerequisites: CHM-231 (minimum grade of C) and CHM-232 (minimum grade of C)
Corequisites: CHM-234.

Course usage information

CHM-234. Organic Chemistry II - Laboratory. 1 Credit.

LAB 3 hrs
Laboratory experiments involve the multi-step synthesis of organic compounds, which illustrate the principles of CHM-233, using macroscale and microscale techniques. All remedial courses listed must be completed prior to taking this course.
Prerequisites: CHM-231 (minimum grade of C) and CHM-232 (minimum grade of C)
Corequisites: CHM-233
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

CHM-235. Independent Study in Chemistry. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
This course is an opportunity for selected students to participate in independent research under close supervision of a Chemistry faculty member. Interested students should make their interest known early in the prior semester to the department chair who will detail the criteria for selection.
Prerequisites: Permission of department chair
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

CHM-295. Special Topics in Chemistry. 4 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs, LAB 3 hrs
An examination of selected topics or issues in chemistry. Topics may differ each time the course is offered. Students should consult the department chair for further information.
Prerequisites: An introductory course in Chemistry and permission of department chair
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

CHM-296. Special Topics in Chemistry. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
An examination of selected topics or issues in chemistry. Topics may differ each time the course is offered. Students should consult the department chair for further information.
Prerequisites: An introductory course in Chemistry and permission of department chair.

Course usage information

MAT-006. Elements of Algebra. 0 Credits.

LECT 2 hrs, RECI 1 hr
Elements of Algebra integrates the fundamental operations of arithmetic and introductory Algebra. It is intended for students whose placement examination indicates a need for a review of arithmetic and basic Algebra skills. Topics include operations on whole numbers, fractions, decimals, percent and signed numbers, linear equations and inequalities in one variable, operations on polynomials, factoring, integer exponents, and graphing. The course incorporates a Support Lab where students will receive personal assistance with problems or questions assigned as homework to supplement the lectures.
Prerequisites: Appropriate score on a placement test
Additional Fees: Course fee applies.

Course usage information

MAT-007. Foundations of Algebra. 0 Credits.

LECT 2 hrs
This course integrates selected topics of arithmetic and introductory algebra, including operations on whole numbers, fractions, decimals, percent and signed numbers, linear equations and inequalities in one variable, operations on polynomials, factoring, integer exponents, and graphing. Students are required to complete a series of laboratory assignments, which are designed to reinforce concepts based on the placement test results.
Prerequisites: Appropriate score on a placement test.

Course usage information

MAT-009. Basic Mathematics Ia. 0 Credits.

LECT 1 hr
Three (3) hours per day for one week. This is an intensive one-week review of topics typically found on the computation placement test. A passing grade satisfies the Basic Mathematics requirement.
Prerequisites: Appropriate score on a placement test.

Course usage information

MAT-010. Basic Algebra 1A. 0 Credits.

LECT 1 hr
This is an intensive review of topics typically found on the basic algebra placement test. A passing grade satisfies the Basic Algebra requirement.
Prerequisites: Appropriate score on a placement test.

Course usage information

MAT-011. Basic Mathematics I. 0 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
A preparatory course designed for students who need additional practice and review in arithmetic.

Course usage information

MAT-014. Basic Algebra I. 0 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
A preparatory course in elementary algebra which includes rational numbers, polynomials, algebraic operations, first-degree equations, graphing, systems of linear equations, problem solving and an introduction to the quadratic equations.
Prerequisites: MAT-009 or MAT-011 and permission of department chair.

Course usage information

MAT-016. Intermediate Algebra. 0 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
A second-level preparatory algebra course designed to prepare students for credit-level mathematics courses. Covered are selected topics, including systems of linear equations, polynomials, factoring, rational expressions, radicals and solving quadratic equations.
Prerequisites: MAT-007 or equivalent Minimum grade P.

Course usage information

MAT-050. Fundamentals of Mathematics. 0 Credits.

LECT 5 hrs
This course integrates selected topics of arithmetic and introductory algebra, including computation, topics in geometry, operations on signed numbers, solving linear equations in one variable, operations on polynomials, factoring, integer exponents and graphing.
Prerequisites: Appropriate score on a placement test.

Course usage information

MAT-060. Fundamentals of Algebra. 0 Credits.

LECT 6 hrs
An intensive one-semester course to prepare students for credit mathematics courses. Topics include computation, polynomials, exponents, linear equations, factoring, rational expressions, radicals and solving quadratic equations.
Prerequisites: Appropriate score on a placement test or permission of department chair.

Course usage information

MAT-110. College Algebra. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
An intensive course designed to prepare students for mathematics courses such as Calculus with Applications to Business and Economics and Precalculus. It covers selected algebra topics including exponents; rational expressions; polynomials, radicals, relations and functions; exponential and logarithmic functions, systems of equations.
Prerequisites: MAT-016 or MAT-060 (grade C or better) or equivalent.

Course usage information

MAT-113. Applied Calculus. 4 Credits.

LECT 4 hrs
A study of topics which provides a basis for continuing courses in mathematics and the physical sciences. This course includes trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions; analytic geometry; differentiation and integration.
Prerequisites: MAT-110 or MAT-123 or equivalent.

Course usage information

MAT-117. Mathematical Analysis for Business and Economics. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
Mathematical topics used in business and economics with emphasis on applications. Covered are polynomials, linear and quadratic models, systems of equations, matrix algebra, and linear programming including the Simplex Method.
Prerequisites: MAT-016, MAT-060 (grade of C or better) or equivalent.

Course usage information

MAT-118. Calculus With Application to Business And Economics. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
A course covering functions, derivatives and integration, with special consideration of applications to the business and economics areas. Partial differentiation is introduced.
Prerequisites: MAT-110 (grade of C or better) or equivalent.

Course usage information

MAT-120. Mathematics for the Liberal Arts. 4 Credits.

LECT 4 hrs
A course addressed to liberal arts students. Topics include the history of mathematics, probability, statistics, geometry, number theory, algebra, graphs and functions, and a choice of selected topics.
Prerequisites: MAT-007, MAT-014, MAT-050 or equivalent.

Course usage information

MAT-123. Precalculus. 4 Credits.

LECT 4 hrs
An intensive one-semester course to prepare students for Analytic Geometry and Calculus, including absolute values; relations; functions; equations; inequalities; polynomial, rational, trigonometric, inverse trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions; trigonometric equations and identities; and graphs.
Prerequisites: MAT-110 (grade of C or better) or equivalent.

Course usage information

MAT-124. Statistics. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
The fundamental principles of statistical methods. Descriptive statistics, correlation, regression, probability, binomial and normal distributions, sampling, elementary hypothesis testing, confidence intervals and ethical issues in statistics are included.
Prerequisites: MAT-016, MAT-060, MAT-120 or equivalent.

Course usage information

MAT-130. Probability and Statistics. 4 Credits.

LECT 4 hrs
The fundamental principles of statistical methods. Descriptive statistics, correlation, regression, probability, binomial and normal distributions, sampling, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals and ethical issues in statistics are included. An introduction to the use of statistical software to analyze data will be emphasized.
Prerequisites: MAT-016, MAT-060 or MAT-120 or equivalent.

Course usage information

MAT-131. Analytic Geometry and Calculus I. 4 Credits.

LECT 4 hrs
The first semester of a three-semester sequence. Analytic geometry in the plane, differentiation and applications, and integration are covered.
Prerequisites: MAT-123 (grade of C or better) or equivalent.

Course usage information

MAT-132. Analytic Geometry and Calculus II. 4 Credits.

LECT 4 hrs
A continuation of Analytic Geometry and Calculus I, which covers the calculus of inverse trigonometric functions, methods of integration, analytic geometry in the plane including polar coordinates and conic sections, hyperbolic functions, sequences and series, and parametric equations.
Prerequisites: MAT-131 (grade of C or better) or equivalent.

Course usage information

MAT-140. Math for Radiographers. 1 Credit.

LECT 1 hr
This course discusses the math skills that are crucial in the healthcare environment. It teaches the basis measurements, calculations, percents, ratios, and proportions, scientific notation, metric conversions, basis algebraic principles and basic geometric principles used in Radiology. It reviews whole numbers, fractions, decimals and exponents. Radiology units and numeric prefixes are also discussed.
Prerequisites: MAT-016 or MAT-060 and admission to the Radiography program
Corequisites: RAD-100, RAD-104 and RAD-107.

Course usage information

MAT-183. Honors Probability and Statistics. 4 Credits.

LECT 4 hrs
An introduction to the principles of statistical methods. The course will integrate spreadsheet software to cover such topics as descriptive statistics, correlation, regression, probability, binomial and normal distributions, sampling, elementary hypothesis testing and confidence intervals. This course will also cover ethical issues in statistics. Comprehensive case studies will be covered throughout the semester. An introduction to the use of statistical software to analyze large data sets will be emphasized.
Prerequisites: Permission of department chair or honors advisor.

Course usage information

MAT-210. Probability and Statistics II. 4 Credits.

LECT 4 hrs
This course is a continuation of statistical analysis from Probability and Statistics. Techniques for collection and analysis of data emphasizing estimation and hypothesis testing, analysis of variance and regression analysis are included. Also included are nonparametric testing and an introduction to multiple regression. A focus on analyzing large data sets using statistical software.
Prerequisites: MAT-124 or MAT-130 or MAT-183 or equivalent (grade of C or better).

Course usage information

MAT-225. Discrete Mathematics. 4 Credits.

LECT 4 hrs
This is a 4-credit course in discrete mathematics. It is offered to math & computer science majors in their first two years of study. The course outline shows it is an exposition of real-world and modern mathematics. Discrete Mathematics covers a breadth of unique topics in number theory, graph theory, set theory, probability and statistics, and propositional logic.
Prerequisites: MAT-131.

Course usage information

MAT-228. Linear Algebra. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
Selected topics including matrices and determinants, vectors and vector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, with applications from a variety of disciplines.
Prerequisites: MAT-132 (grade of C or better) or equivalent.

Course usage information

MAT-230. Calculus III. 4 Credits.

LECT 4 hrs
A continuation of Analytic Geometry and Calculus II which includes analytic geometry in three dimensions, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, vectors and an introduction to vector analysis.
Prerequisites: MAT-132 (grade of C or better) or equivalent.

Course usage information

MAT-232. Differential Equations. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
Ordinary differential equations and methods of solution. Introduction to classical equations and their solutions, with some applications to geometry, physics and engineering.
Prerequisites: MAT-132 (grade of C or better) or equivalent.

Course usage information

MAT-270. Numbers and Operations for Middle Grades. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
This course prepares middle-grades mathematics teachers with a concrete understanding of numbers, number systems, operations with fractions, decimals and percent; there is special consideration to ratios, proportions, factors and multiples and including instructional techniques and calculator-structured lessons.
Prerequisites: Permission of department chair and Elementary School or N-2 subject matter endorsement.

Course usage information

MAT-271. Algebra for Middle Grades. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
This course explores topics from pre-algebra and algebra. The course prepares middle-grades mathematics teachers with a concrete understanding of patterns, relationships and functions, polynomials, algebraic operations, first degree equations, graphing and systems of linear equations and linear inequalities and including instructional techniques and calculator-structured lessons.
Prerequisites: Permission of department chair and Elementary School or N-2 subject matter endorsement.

Course usage information

MAT-272. Mathematics for Middle Grades. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
This course explores topics including history of mathematics, algebra, probability and statistics while infusing instructional techniques and uses of technology.
Prerequisites: Permission of department chair and Elementary School or N-2 subject matter endorsement.

Course usage information

MAT-273. Statistics for Middle Grades. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
An introduction to statistical methods and reasoning as applied to practical problems. Topics include collecting and summarizing data, histograms and other types of graphs, descriptive statistics, normal distributions, sampling, surveys, use of computers in statistics and interpretation of data.
Prerequisites: Permission of department chair and Elementary School or N-2 subject matter endorsement.

Course usage information

MAT-274. Geometry for Middle Grades. 3 Credits.

LECT 3 hrs
This course includes topics in geometry and measurements with use of Geometer Sketchpad Software. Formulas for perimeter, area, and volume for polygons and polyhedrons, properties of parallel lines and perpendicular lines, fundamental topics of measurements, measurement instruments, measurement errors are covered while infusing instructional techniques.
Prerequisites: Permission of department chair and Elementary School or N-2 subject matter endorsement.